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Archive for June, 2013

Mass political protests grip Egypt

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

Cairo and other Egyptian cities see huge rallies for and against President Morsi a year after he took power, with four people killed in violence.
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Tweet of the day #june30 edition

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

Size of all protests stands as a testament to the readiness of the Egyptian ppl 2 engage in peaceful democratic political expression #Egypt

— Gehad El-Haddad (@gelhaddad) June 30, 2013

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Crowds march in Egypt, pushing for Morsi removal

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

An Egyptian protester waves a national flag as Egyptians gather in Tahrir Square during a demonstration against President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, Sunday, June 30, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of opponents of Egypt's Islamist president poured out onto the streets in Cairo and across much of the nation Sunday, launching an all-out push to force Mohammed Morsi from office on the one-year anniversary of his inauguration. Fears of violence were high, with Morsi's Islamist supporters vowing to defend him. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)CAIRO (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of opponents of Egypt's Islamist president poured onto the streets in Cairo and across much of the nation Sunday, launching an all-out push to force Mohammed Morsi from office on the one-year anniversary of his inauguration. Fears of violence were high, with Morsi's Islamist supporters vowing to defend him.

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Kerry says progress made in peace talks

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry smiles at a question from a reporter during a news conference about his trip to the Middle East, in Tel Aviv, Israel on Sunday, June 30, 2013. Kerry engaged in breakneck shuttle diplomacy to coax Israel and the Palestinians back into peace talks over a four-day span with multiple trips to Jordan and Israel and a stop in the West Bank town of Ramallah. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool)TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry completed a new round of shuttle diplomacy Sunday without a hoped-for breakthrough in relaunching Mideast peace talks, but optimistically said he had narrowed the gaps between Israel and the Palestinians and vowed to return to the region soon to complete his mission.

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A look at Egypt’s political standoff

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

Graffiti, including a caricature of President Mohammed Morsi, left and ousted President Hosni Munarak, is painted on the wall of a building across from the Ministry of Culture in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 30, 2013. Hundreds of thousands of opponents of Egypt's Islamist president poured out onto the streets in Cairo and across much of the nation Sunday, launching an all-out push to force Mohammed Morsi from office on the one-year anniversary of his inauguration. Fears of violence were high, with Morsi's Islamist supporters vowing to defend him. The red Arabic words below the face drawing reads, "Whoever cost it didn't die." The Arabic next to the face drawing reads, "Down with the rule of sheep." The red and white Arabic reads, "The revolution is everywhere against the killer and the traitor." (AP Photo/Hiro Komae)CAIRO (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians took to the streets Sunday, some in support of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and others to call for his ouster. Here is a look at Egypt's current political standoff, what it means and where it could lead:

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The Anti-US component of the uprising in Egypt

June 30th, 2013 Comments off
The US media don’t report that the protests in Egypt today (and previously) have a strong anti-US component.  Many signs in the protests are directed at the US and its perceived support for Morsi.  In the interviews on the streets today, especially on New TV, many protesters directed their anger at the US for its embrace of Morsi, in return for security cooperation with Israel.  People here still think that Arabs are too dumb to notice what is happening.

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Wait: so Syria is the backyard of Qatar? So is it the backyward of Hizbullah too?

June 30th, 2013 Comments off
““Syria is their backyard, and they have their own interests they are pursing,” said one administration official.”  So does the administration then accept such an argument from Hizbullah?

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‘The 19th Day of the Egyptian Revolution’: What the Egyptian Press is Saying about Today’s Mass Protest

June 30th, 2013 Comments off

Via the USG Open Source Center, report on Egypt press for June 30, 2013 (arrangement and headings by JC), regarding the massive demonstrations throughout the country by leftists, liberals and Muslim centrists against the presidency of Muhammad Morsi, elected one year ago, who represents the religious Right and is seen by many Egyptians arrogant, high-handed and sectarian.

On the Meaning of the Opposition Millions in the Street

al-Tahrir [Liberation]: The front page carries the single word ‘go’ against a red background

al-Tahrir: Article by Jalal Arif says millions will take to the streets today to issue the death certificate of a regime that lost legitimacy. The writer views 30 June as ‘the 19th day of the 25 Jan revolution.’

Al-Wafd [The Delegation]: Article by Wajdi Zayn-al-Din states ‘Today is the day the ruling regime goes to no return and the day the Egyptian people restore their revolution which the Muslim Brothers had stolen.’

al-Misri al-Yawm [Egypt Today] : Article by Dr Hasan Nafi’ah states that taking to the streets in huge numbers and insisting on staying there until demands are met opens a new door of hope and turns a new chapter in Egypt’s history, which the writer hopes will be brighter.

al-Misri al-Yawm: Article by Dr Amr Al-Shubaki says ‘Mursi’s speech [last Wednesday] provoked many people and incited them to take part in 30 June protests, after giving them the impression that this despotic regime does not listen or respond and that it only sees its clan.’

al-Akhbar [The News]: Article by Muhammad Abd-al-Hafiz says today is the day of ‘popular referendum on whether the president should stay in his post or leave.’

al-Watan [The Nation]: Article by Chief Editor Majdi Al-Jallad urges Mursi to ‘listen carefully to the millions in Egyptian squares.’

al-Ahram [The Pyramids]: Article by Abd-al-Muhsin Salamah views the call for early presidential elections as ‘the optimal life buoy,’ especially since the presidency has not offered the minimum acceptable solution represented in changing the government and appointing a new public prosecutor.

On the Muslim Brotherhood counter-demonstration in Nasr City

al-Wafd: Article by Ala Uraybi says Muslim Brother leaders push the simple poor people to death so that they can tighten their grip on power. ‘They drag the simple citizen to squares and turn him into a thug and a criminal who kills his brother in order to defend Muhammad Mursi,’ the writer says. He stresses to Muslim Brothers ‘It is high time for you to leave and to be brought to account for the blood that was spilled in the streets.’

al-Misri al-Yawm: Article by Yasir Abd-al-Aziz lashes out at the regime for its ‘lowly game of playing on the people’s religious sentiments.’

Lament that Egyptian Parties play an Adolescent Zero-Sum Game

al-Watan: Article by Imad-al-Din Adib states that the problem with all political powers in Egypt is that ‘they all believe in the principle of taking all or nothing, which reflects a state of political adolescence that never solved a problem.’ The writer stresses that we have to realize that no party can negate the other completely.

al-Shuruq al-Jadid: Article by Imad-al-Din Husayn urges the opposition stick to the peacefulness of their protests because the alternative is ‘blood baths.’ The writer observes that some opposition figures tend to picture Muslim Brothers as devils and that others call for killing them. ‘Muslim Brothers are a national power that has a powerful presence in the streets; and we have to treat them as political opponents and not enemies,’ the writer says.

al-Jumhuriyyah [The Republic]: Article by Chief Editor Al-Sayyid Al-Babili fears that ‘the ghost of civil war is looking upon us.’ The writer views scenes of clashes in various governorates as proof that ‘we have not absorbed democracy as yet and were not qualified for it.’

The Danger of Sabotage

al-Shuruq [Sunrise]: Article by Fahmi Huwaydi [pro-Brotherhood] says he does not fear peaceful demonstrations as much as he fears those who infiltrate the lines and spread anarchy. ‘The militia of thuggery almost constitutes a parallel army estimated at 300,000 members,’ the writer says. He finds it ‘surprising’ that the security agencies are showing ‘tolerance’ with these thugs. (p 16; 900 words)

al-Ahram: Article by Dr Wahid Abd-al-Majid urges protestors to avoid al-Ittihadiyah [Presidential] palace to deny those who harbor bad intentions the chance of instigating violence.

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Chomsky: On Objectivity and subjectivity in US media

June 30th, 2013 Comments off
From Joerg in Berlin:  “”(In the US you) get an impression that everything is free and open
because there are debates that are visible: the Democrats are debating the Republicans, and the press does its share of condemning. But what people don’t see — and the seeming openness of the debate conceals it — is that it is all within a very narrow framework. And you can’t go even a millimetre outside that framework. In fact, it is even taught in journalism schools here as the concept of ‘objectivity’ — that means describing honestly what’s going on inside that framework and if there
is something outside, then no, that is subjective. (…) During the 2012 presidential elections, the two countries that were mentioned way more than anyone else in all debates were Israel and Iran. And Iran was described as the greatest threat to world peace. And that’s what’s repeated in the media all the time. There is an obvious question that no journalist would ask: who thinks so? They don’t think so in India; they don’t think so in the Arab world, they don’t think so in South America. The only countries to think so are the United States and England. But that you can’t report.”

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humans and sub humans

June 30th, 2013 Comments off
“The truly scary thing about all of this is that we’re living in an age where some very strange decisions are being made about who deserves rights, and who doesn’t. Someone shooting at an American soldier in Afghanistan (or who is even alleged to have done so) isn’t really a soldier, and therefore isn’t really protected by the Geneva Conventions, and therefore can be whisked away for life to some extralegal detention center. We can kill some Americans by drone attacks without trial because they’d ceased to have rights once they become enemy combatants, a determination made not collectively but by some Star Chamber somewhere. Some people apparently get the full human-rights coverage; some people on the other end aren’t really 100 percent people, so they don’t.”

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