Archive

Posts Tagged ‘tomorrow’

Let the party begin

July 27th, 2012 Comments off

The 2012 London Olympics countdown ends tomorrow as Egypt’s quest for medals starts, Inas Mazhar reports
Go to Source

Tomorrow is the Fourth of July . . .

July 4th, 2012 Comments off

. . . and so I declare my independence of blogging for one day. See you Thursday, and a happy fourth to my American readers. (No hard feelings, British readers. That tax on tea was a long time ago.)


Go to Source

Tomorrow the Independent and Guardian will hail her as a feminist and reformer

June 4th, 2012 Comments off
“A Saudi princess was caught trying to leave the Shangri-La hotel in Paris without settling a six million euro ($7.4 million) bill for her rooms, police said Saturday, confirming a report in the daily Le Parisien.  Maha al-Sudani, the former wife of Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Nayef ben Abdel Aziz, tried to walk out on 3:30 am Thursday without paying for her suite and those of her 60-strong entourage, prompting staff to call in police, Le Parisien reported.  The Saudi Arabian ambassador was also contacted during the incident, added Le Parisien, which noted that Sudani enjoys diplomatic immunity.  When contacted by AFP, the luxury hotel’s director Alain Borgers said that there are “no problems” with its clients and “no unpaid bills” at the moment.” (thanks “Ibn Rushd”)

Go to Source

Backgrounders for the Mubarak Verdict Tomorrow

June 2nd, 2012 Comments off

The Mubarak verdict should come down in the morning. I’ll try to post on it some time over the weekend but family commitments may slow down my posting, but here are a couple of backgrounders to understand the results, whichever way it goes:

Zine El Abidine Ben Ali is in a guesthouse in Jidda and Mu‘ammar Qadhafi is dead; only Mubarak, so far, has faced a court. As I noted earlier a small army of 20,000 police and security forces and 160 armored vehicles are reportedly being deployed around where the court is sitting.


Go to Source

Egypt On the Eve

May 22nd, 2012 Comments off

The Egyptian election for President begins tomorrow. Since a runoff will be required we still won’t knoiw the results for a while, but at least we will finally, 15 months after the departure of Husni Mubarak, get some clue about who will lead Egypt (along with the Army, most likely) for the net several years.

The New York Times looks at the role of SCAF;  while if you need a last-minute rundown of the candidates you can go here to Ahram Online. There had been talk that SCAF would unilaterally issue a new Constitutional Declaration to set the terms of the new President’s power since there is no constitution in place; now they’re “not setting a timeframe” but clearly it’s awkward if neither the voters nor the candidates know what the powers of the new President will be.

So they’re off. Let’s see what happens.


Go to Source

"Curveball" confesses to lying about WMDs

April 3rd, 2012 Comments off

Man whose WMD lies led to 100,000 deaths confesses all – The Independent

A man whose lies helped to make the case for invading Iraq – starting a nine-year war costing more than 100,000 lives and hundreds of billions of pounds – will come clean in his first British television interview tomorrow.

But Mr Janabi, speaking in a two-part series, Modern Spies, starting tomorrow on BBC2, says none of it was true. When it is put to him “we went to war in Iraq on a lie. And that lie was your lie”, he simply replies: “Yes.”

 

“Curveball”, the Iraqi defector who fabricated claims about Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction, smiles as he confirms how he made the whole thing up. It was a confidence trick that changed the course of history, with Rafid Ahmed Alwan al-Janabi’s lies used to justify the Iraq war.

He tries to defend his actions: “My main purpose was to topple the tyrant in Iraq because the longer this dictator remains in power, the more the Iraqi people will suffer from this regime’s oppression.”

The chemical engineer claimed to have overseen the building of a mobile biological laboratory when he sought political asylum in Germany in 1999. His lies were presented as “facts and conclusions based on solid intelligence” by Colin Powell, US Secretary of State, when making the case for war at the UN Security Council in February 2003.

Of course the real crime is not an Iraqi trying to manipulate foreign powers — it’s the US and UK officials who decided to believe him because they wanted the war anyway. And none of these have yet been prosecuted.

 



Go to Source

Rami Khouri on the Baghdad Summit

March 29th, 2012 Comments off

Tomorrow’s Arab League SAummit in Baghdad will be a showcase moment for post-occupation Iraq, but despite its focus on Syria and the importance of the moment following a year of dramatic change in the Arab world, it’s a rare observer who gets excited over Arab Summits. Even the once-dependable entertainment value once provided by the late Mu‘ammar al-Qadhafi, with his penchant for denouncing his hosts, attacking the Saudi King, and making outrageous statements is no more, and missed, I’m sure, by none of the surviving attendees.

But one commentator who can usually be counted on for intelligent comment is Rami Khouri, in “Four Arab Worlds Will Meet in Baghdad,” (differentiated by the effects of the Arab Awakening on them), so read what he has to say. I probably won’t post on the Summit again unless something actually happens, which would be precedent-shattering in its own right.


Go to Source

Omar Khayyam (67)

March 23rd, 2012 Comments off

They say that drunkards
are consigned to hell;
but that makes no sense
and the heart cannot 
accept it.
If lovers and lushes
are going to hell,
tomorrow heaven will be
as empty as my hand.

Translated by Juan Cole
from [pdf] Whinfield 67

Go to Source

Tomorrow: International Women’s Day in Cairo This Year Has Special Resonance

March 7th, 2012 Comments off

Tomorrow, March 8, marks International Women’s Day, but in Egypt it has other symbolism as well, since it marks a year since the demonstrations that led to the now notorious “virginity tests” that have become a rallying cry for women’s rights and a black eye for the military regime. (March 16, on the other hand, is Egyptianb Women’s Day, marking the famous protest by women during the 1919 Revolution.) Tomorrow will be marked by a women’s march to the Journalists’ s Syndicate (poster at left). It seeks greater political representation after relatively few women were elected to Parliament.

Actually, at the International Women’s Day last year women were harassed and cursed;  it was at the broader Tahrir Square Friday demonstrations the next day, March 9, that the first “virginity tests” were reported.http://mideasti.blogspot.com/2011/03/moment-for-outrage-abuse-of-women-in.html Throughout the troubled past year women have frequently been in the crossfire (sometimes literally, always figuratively), memorably including the searing photos of the beating and stripping of the “blue bra woman” that led US Secretary of State Clinton to denounce “the systematic degradation of women,”  Samira Ibrahim’s legal fight against the Army, journalist MonaElTahawy’s beating, groping and broken arms, culminating in the powerful Women’s March in December. Nor, of course, is this a complete catalog of the violence inflicted on women, not just as part of the revolutionary upheaval, but as part of daily life. I’ve also sought to note the historical roles of Hoda Sha‘arawi, and of the first women’s demonstration during the Uprising of 1919.

It has been a turbulent year for Egypt as a whole and particularly for Egyptian women, who have, however, made their voices heard. As did their great-great-grandmothers in that earlier revolution of 1919.

Women Demonstrating in 1919


Go to Source

Yemen’s New President Will Be Sworn In Tomorrow

February 25th, 2012 Comments off

‘Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi has been elected Yemen’s new President; he’ll be sworn in tomorrow and a formal inaugural ceremony will be held Monday.

He was elected with 99.8% of the vote. His predecessor, ‘Ali ‘Abdullah Salih, is returning from the US and expected to attend the inauguration. Hadi was Salih’s Vice President.

The Yemeni Revolution isn’t looking very revolutionary right at the moment.


Go to Source